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Evil Season Finale: Beset on All Sides

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BY January 31, 2020
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With its season finale, “Book 27,” Evil on CBS brought an impressive season to a close. There were revelations a-plenty and intriguing mysteries to follow in the next season. So let’s get into it.

It All Begins in a Familiar Way: A Quick Recap

Evil season finale image via CBS

Dr. Boggs (Kurt Fuller), Kristen’s own therapist, asks the God squad–Kristen, David, and Ben–to talk to a patient of his. Said patient, Eleanor (Laura Heisler), is pregnant with fraternal twins. Everything should be wonderful, but she’s convinced that her future son is possessed. And not with verve or personality. No, she thinks he’s got the old-fashioned demon fever, and he’s a threat to her and her other fetus.

Although they all approach the case with their usual skepticism, many strange events ensue that can’t readily be explained. Sure, for example, Eleanor could theoretically have faked her reaction to receiving the host at church. However, it’s a lot harder to disappear a fetus inside you. (Vanishing twin syndrome is a real thing, by the way.)

On the other hand, they could just chalk all this up to coincidences, much like with some of their past cases. Then, Ben (the magnificent) hears a familiar tune in Eleanor’s house. A teddy bear, marked with a logo from a fertility clinic, is playing “Pudsy’s Christmas,” that infernal melody from the “7 Swans a Singin” episode that made all the kids go mad. When David and Ben visit the clinic, they see that several of the clinic’s success stories are also the God squad’s failures, like Eric McCrystal, the troubled kid from the episode “Rose390.” Based on that and the occult symbol the clinic uses in its logo, David starts forming a theory. You don’t have to kill all the first-born children to wreak havoc on a society. You can just poison them from the womb.

The Evil Season Finale Asks If Others Might Be Poisoned, Too

Evil season finale image via CBS

David’s theory, incidentally, is more than a little distressing to Kristen, because she turned to that same clinic when she and whatshisname (Editor’s Note: Andy the Unimpressive) were having trouble conceiving. Little Lexis (Maddy Crocco) was the possibly poisoned fruit of that endeavor. If she’s evil, then we don’t know yet. However, signs sure seem to be pointing to yes, or at least to the possibility that her evil programming (a la The Manchurian Candidate) will kick in soon.

Kristen, of course, doesn’t really have a lot of time to dwell on that, though, because she’s preoccupied with all the actually evil men in her life. First of all, her mom, a gold-plated dummy, is set to marry Leland. She’s also the kind of person who refers to her significant other as her “lover,” and she is not Taylor Swift, so she can leave. Meanwhile, Orson LeRoux is using his new free time to harass Kristen. When he turns up dead, after Kristen has mysterious blood on her leg, it’s suspicious, to say the least. But nothing comes as a bigger shocker than when Kristen picks up a rosary and it burns her hand. Has she been evil? Or did killing Orson–ALLEGEDLY–cause some evil transference?

We’ll have to wait until this fall–no, so far away–to find out. But we can always speculate–making up things is my favorite! As Joshua mentioned in that link, they can’t keep playing will they/won’t they with the existence of evil. Either, the evil is real or it’s not, and every episode will be just another week of…whatever the religious equivalent of “It’s not lupus” is. Since the show will collapse in on itself if everything is just a gosh-darn misunderstanding, then the evil has to be real. And it doesn’t even have to be ancient or Satanic evil. People can do bad all by themselves. Just ask the McCrystals. Or, you know, whoever killed Orson LeRoux.

Have you watched the Evil season finale? If so, what are your theories? And what are you looking forward to seeing in the future? Let us know on social media or below in the comments.

featured image via CBS

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Salomé Gonstad is a freelance writer who grew up in the swampy wilds of south Alabama. She now splits her time between the Appalachian wilds (of Alabama) and the considerably more refined streets of New York City. When she's not yelling about pop culture on the internet, she's working on a supernatural thriller about her hometown. Also, we're pretty sure she's a werewolf.

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