Lucifer Season Five Extension: Six More Hours Added to Final Season

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BY July 28, 2019

The final season of the series loosely based on Neil Gaiman and Mike Carey’s Lucifer character just got six more hours to tell its story. The Lucifer season five extension, first reported by Deadline, comes as a surprise because of how quickly the show was cancelled after arriving at Netflix. It became clear that the rescued series was on the bubble because the show’s creators and cast all pushed their fans to get it trending during the weekend the fourth season released. So, when Netflix dropped the news they renewed Lucifer for season five, that particular extension came with some added bad news. The fifth season would be the last for the strange, heartfelt series that shouldn’t work but totally does. In fact, the #SaveLucifer social media warriors might just be responsible for the newest Lucifer season five extension.

Lucifer Season Five Is the Final Season

When the news broke that Fox cancelled Lucifer in 2018, it came amidst a deluge of cancellations for the network. Fan-favorites like Brooklyn 99, Gotham, and other shows were all sent packing. This happened, in part, because Fox’s sports rights packages meant less room on the schedule for scripted shows. Another reason, possibly, are the “Streaming Wars.” Since it is based on a DC comic property, Lucifer is produced by Warner Bros. TV. Their network, the CW, is already full of cape-shows, and HBO Max was still too far out to save the show. Yet, thanks to fans who got Lucifer to the top of Twitter’s trending topics, Netflix agreed to pick up the series. When Lucifer fans got the show to trend once more when the fourth season premiered, a renewal wasn’t far behind.

That the series would return but only for a single season felt bittersweet to fans. Since #TeamLucifer did it once before, they began to plan a campaign to push for a sixth season. One fan reached out to showrunner Ildy Modrovich, who admitted she felt conflicted about the issue in the above tweet. She wrote that she could produce the show “forever,” but also appreciated that Netflix will allow the series to come to a deliberate end. So many shows receive unceremonious cancellations, and their fans end up with no closure or dangling cliffhangers. Furthermore, Modrovich promised a love-letter to their fans with Lucifer’s final season. Yet, in a way, Netflix allowing this extension might be a way for fans to have their devil and eat him, too.

The Extension Means More Lucifer and Maybe a Two-Part Season

In another tweet, Modrovich credited the Lucifer season five extension to the fans, perhaps because of their never-ending social media clamor for more of the show. This also means that Lucifer could do what other Netflix shows have done like Enchanted and Arrested Development have done. They can release their final season as a “part one” and a “part two.” The fans get more time with their favorite characters, the show gets a bit of an extended life, and (Dad willing) everyone ends up happier for it. It also means that with this and the upcoming Sandman series, Netflix is staying in the Warner Bros. TV business for a little bit longer. As much as the streaming wars will be fought over original content, bingeable favorite shows are still very much part of the equation.

We won’t get into spoilers for the series, at least not until we publish our in-depth series review. What we can say is that the last season left Lucifer in a position that served as a series ender, but arguably one on a down note. These final 16 episodes promise to be suitably epic enough that the larger story sufficiently wraps up and fans get more than enough “Crime-Solving Devil” to satisfy them one last time. Though, since Lucifer got his start in the Sandman comic, #TeamLucifer can start campaigning to get Tom Ellis a guest spot on that series!

What do you think about the Lucifer season five extension? Is it enough? Too much? Tell us in the comments below or by sharing the article on social media.

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Joshua M. Patton is a father, veteran, and writer living in Pittsburgh, PA. The first books he read on his own were comics, and he's loved the medium ever since. He is the greatest star-pilot in the galaxy, a cunning warrior, and a good friend. His book "What I Learned: Stories, Essays, and More" is available in print from Amazon and from all electronic booksellers.

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