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Stan Lee’s Final Cameo Is Not In a Marvel Movie

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BY April 29, 2020
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Marvel fans attending the premiere of Spider-Man: Far From Home wanted answers to a lot of questions, including whether or not the late Stan Lee was able to film a cameo for it. Sadly, the godfather of Marvel Comics did not appear in that movie, but fans of the Stan the Man can get one more sighting in an unlikely film. Stan Lee’s final cameo comes not in an MCU film but rather in Madness in the Method, the directorial debut of Jason Mewes. If you’re thinking, “Snootchie bootchies, that name sounds familiar,” you’re right. Mewes is best known for playing one half of the iconic duo Jay and Silent Bob with his real-life longtime friend Kevin Smith.

In fact, being known as one-half of this pair of idiot savants is the central premise of this film where a fictionalized version of Jay wants to transition to serious acting. Mewes takes up “method acting,” and hilarity (and murder!) ensues. Yet, when the trailer for the film premiered last week what got people talking was not Jay’s acting or directing, but rather Stan Lee’s final cameo. This is remarkable because the cast is star-studded, featuring Teri Hatcher, Danny Trejo, Gina Carrano, and Evana Lynch. Yet, due to his appearances in almost all of the Marvel films, Stan Lee is as big a star as any of them.

Jay and Silent Bob and Stan

Like Kevin Smith, Mewes is a lifelong fan of comic books, especially the work of Stan Lee. In an Instagram post, Smith revealed that the day Stan Lee showed up to film his part in the movie, Mewes broke down in tears out of gratitude. Yet, their relationship is more than just that of a fan and Stan. In Smith’s 1995 sophomore film MallRats, a then-little-known Stan Lee appeared as a major character in the film. Lee does a signing at the mall in which the film takes place, and he meets up with Jason Lee’s (no relation) character to impart some wisdom about love and life. Of course, he uses references to a Spider-Man story he wrote. After that experience, Smith and Stan Lee grew very close.

In a tear-filled eulogy to Stan Lee on his Fatman on Batman podcast, Smith revealed that Stan thought of him like a son. When reports emerged that Stan Lee suffered from elder abuse, Kevin Smith publicly invited Stan to come and live with him. Smith, Mewes, and Stan Lee were close, so it’s no surprise that Stan Lee would take the chance to act in Mewes’s film. While the full extent of Lee’s involvement in the movie is still unknown, in the scene we see Lee references Jay’s “snootchie bootchie” catchphrase and calls him a knucklehead. It’s a loving insult though, and there is no question that Lee was as grateful for the chance to act as Mewes was to have him in the film.

Life Imitating Art Imitating Life

In Kevin Smith’s films, Mewes is shown to be something of a drug-addled knucklehead but in a very lovable way. Still, in real life, Mewes struggled with addiction so much so that even Smith his friend might not survive it. However, according to statements by those who know him, Mewes is triumphing over his addiction. Clean for some time, Mewes’s acting career is going well. He’s appeared in a number of projects like TV series Vigilante Diaries, Hawaii Five-0, Z-Nation, and The Flash. He’s also appeared in a handful of films. Ironically, Smith tells Mewes he’s not a “leading man,” despite Smith casting him as the lead in both Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back and Jay and Silent Bob Reboot, to come later this year. Directing this film is a triumph for Jay, both personally and professionally.

The trailer, which you can see below, makes the film seem like a fun comedy that perfectly fits Jay’s acting style. Even if the film is a total mess (which is doubtful), it will be a part of film history because it features the final appearance of Stan Lee, who died in late 2018 just shy of his 96th birthday. Hopefully, things continue to go well for Mewes and the only misadventures and danger he faces are on-screen.

Featured image via IMDB

MoviesPop CultureJason MewesKevin SmithMadness in the Methodstan lee

Joshua M. Patton is a father, veteran, and writer living in Pittsburgh, PA. The first books he read on his own were comics, and he's loved the medium ever since. He is the greatest star-pilot in the galaxy, a cunning warrior, and a good friend. His book "What I Learned: Stories, Essays, and More" is available in print from Amazon and from all electronic booksellers.

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