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Twitch Quarantine Numbers are Insane as Revenue Skyrockets

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BY June 6, 2020
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Considering the amount of time we’ve spent indoors these past months, this story doesn’t feel surprising in theory. If everyone is home, then yeah, it makes sense Twitch quarantine numbers for streams and downloads increased. Honestly, the percentages aren’t that surprising either. It’s logical that download and stream numbers would increase, and in turn, revenue. I was expecting a good jump, but not the jump that reports are suggesting. Some days in May, Twitch’s daily revenue crossed $400,000. Downloads are up, people are spending more time watching streams, and everyone seems in on this service. The gaming community knows and loves Twitch, but now non-gamers are finding streams they enjoy too. The data doesn’t lie: Twitch quarantine numbers are going to be a big impact on the site’s future.

The Insane Rise of Twitch’s Quarantine Numbers

twitch quarantine numbers Image Credit: Twitch Blog

According to data from the first four months of 2020, you can see Twitch quarantine numbers boom around March. For most of the United States, that is when government officials began requesting shelter-in-place practices and social distancing. Nobody is going to say Twitch is rivaling the quarantine numbers of Netflix or other popular services. Still, it’s incredible to think about what Twitch is and why so many people continue and begin to use the platform.

Before lockdowns in March, Twitch averaged around $70,000 in daily revenue. That’s split up of course between Twitch Affiliates and the service itself. In other words, $70,000 sounds like a lot but isn’t as much in terms of take-home cash for any single streamer. Then, social distancing took off. Twitch in parts of April and May neared an average of $400,000 in revenue. I can remember an old South Park episode where they make fun of the idea that people would rather watch games being played than play the games themselves. It’s not so funny anymore given the insane revenue and audiences.

The Emerging Non-Gaming Twitch Audience

twitch quarantine numbers Image Credit: ItsSlikeR on Twitch

There’s a major movement in the Twitch community coming from non-gamers. People who have no interest in gaming are contributing to these numbers. Three distinct categories of streams are driving people to Twitch. Firstly, Just Chatting is the most prominent non-gaming “title” on the platform. This is a place where people come to literally talk about something and interact with an audience. Another booming area is the Music & Performing Arts section. Here, you can play a virtual concert to fans who join the stream. Then, there’s the Talk Shows & Podcasts section, where people are able to stream live recordings of their shows. A Special Events category exists but is not as popular.

The move to provide an easy to use space for creators is one of Twitch’s wisest pivots in marketing and growth. YouTube, Facebook Gaming, and Mixer are making grounds in different ways, but still far behind Twitch’s lead. It’s encouraging to see people interact with the platform in different ways. I’m privy to watching people play things like NBA 2K20 or Super Smash Bros. on Twitch. I’ve also tried games from watching someone stream them. That’s the catalyst for gaming developers and publishers to pay attention to Twitch. Not to mention, as the platform grows, so will audiences looking for things to buy, interact with, and use themselves. It’s not clear if these numbers keep up in a post-quarantine world, but it’s a good momentum heading into a new console generation. Its

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Taylor loves to play video games in his spare time. He has two degrees in Political Communication and wrote his thesis on Marxism and the exploitation of college athletes. In his spare time, he loves spending time with his wife and two Toy Australian Sheppards. He’s always got headphones in, and he’s a diehard Cubs fan.

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